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Outdoors

  • Try shooting trap, skeet, and sporting clays

    As we plunge into full blown summer when there’s very little to hunt, we sometimes get bored … unless we fish.
    I don’t understand it but not everybody fishes!
    Anyway, you’ve got guns, ammo and everything you need to shoot, but nothing to shoot at! That’s not exactly right. You just have to do a little research.
    No birds to shoot at? Why not try trap skeet or maybe sporting clays? The little clay birds fly out of traps (launchers) like little Frisbies. The angles and distances vary to give you a more realistic hunting scenario.

  • Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation banquet is Aug. 1

    Question of the week: In how many states can you hunt elk?
    Well, I don’t know either!
    What I do know is you can hunt them in Kentucky!
    What are the odds of getting drawn to hunt one of those Kentucky elk?

  • Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation banquet is Aug. 1

    Question of the week: In how many states can you hunt elk?
    Well, I don’t know either!
    What I do know is you can hunt them in Kentucky!
    What are the odds of getting drawn to hunt one of those Kentucky elk?

  • What is your favorite game to hunt?

    As an outdoorsman or -woman, have you ever played the “what if” game?
    What if you were given the choice of hunting one season and one season only? Take it even further and chose your weapon and one weapon only?
    What would it be? Would it be doves with a Browning over/under in 12 gauge? Dove hunting would be a good choice. Weather’s usually nice, the bag limit is generous, and you can hunt with a bunch of friends! And they’re good eatin’. You’ll shoot a lot, but hit less than you shoot.

  • Beware terrors of the deep woods

    I’ve been in or around the woods almost all my life. While I’ve never been scared, I’ve been real concerned a few times.
    Those rare times usually resulted from encounters with killer mice and snakes!
    Yes, I said mice ... and snakes. But mostly mice! Not the little gray mice that sometimes get in the house or are left on your doorstep by the family cat (as a gift).
    I’m talking about those evil deep woods mice. The kind with big, crusty yellow teeth and blood red eyes.

  • Bluegill are made to be caught any way you can

    What’s the most pursued fish? Is it bass, catfish, crappie? Or maybe it’s the bluegill?
    I’ll take the little “silver dollar” bluegill fillets, deep fried, any day over most anything else that swims.
    Not only are the gills good to eat, they’re also the most prolific and easiest fish to catch!
    This fish is literally the hook, line and sinker variety … well, add in a float!
    The rod? Pretty much anything you can tie a line to — cane pole, fiberglass pole or just a skinny tree limb.

  • Young wildlife are best left undisturbed

    Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources
     
    FRANKFORT, Ky. – Encounters with young wildlife increase in spring as people spend more time outdoors.
    An unattended deer fawn curled up in tall grass. A litter of rabbits discovered alone in the backyard. A baby bird furiously flapping its wings but struggling to get off the ground.

  • Seeking the end of Kentucky’s coyote problem

    I was talking with a fellow hunter when a discussion about coyote hunting came up. He sort of surprised me when he said, “You must really hate coyotes to want to kill ‘em all.”
    Well, he was kind of right! I do think that every coyote should be eliminated, but I also accept that it’s not possible.

  • Catfish: Smith

    Payten Smith, 8, caught an eight-pound catfish in a farm pond in Marion County. She is the daughter of Andy and Sandy Smith.
     

  • Keeping tabs on deer and controlling coyotes

    With the Memorial Day weekend, I had another early turn-in, so you’ll get another short article this week.
    I got my 2014-15 season’s deer harvest report the other day. It showed that this past season was the second highest harvest — with 138,892 animals taken — since the Department of Fish and Wildlife started keeping records. It was also the third consecutive year when more than 130,000 deer were killed.
    Owen County leads the state with 3,470 deer taken. Statewide, 45.7 percent of the deer checked were does.