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Education

  • MCPS enforcing old, new safety measures

    In response to recent school shootings, officials with Marion County Public Schools, local law enforcement personnel and a representative from the Kentucky Center for School Safety recently reviewed, discussed and brainstormed ways to continue making schools safer for students and staff.

  • State’s nickel match in doubt

    While the state’s pension crisis is weighing heavily on the minds of many Kentuckians, there’s another colossal concern that could become a reality for Marion County. Currently, Governor Matt Bevin’s budget includes significant cuts to education, and does not include matching funds for school districts who passed the recallable nickel in 2016.

  • Education briefs

    Superintendent’s report

    • Monday, Feb. 19, Presidents Day will be used as a make-up day for students and staff. 

    • MCPS has a partnership between Campbellsville University, and more than 60 students (teachers in training) will be participating in classroom experiences helping students and teachers.

  • Marion County teens learn dangers of social media

    Did you know that messages exchanged on the popular app “Snapchat” aren’t permanently deleted?

    That fact alone captured the attention of students at Marion County Knight Academy last week during a special assembly about social media.

    Speaker Scott Harvey, who travels the country speaking with young adults about personal responsibility, shared examples of social media exchanges gone wrong, including video examples of cyber bullying, social media misuse and more. 

  • Blast from the past

    Surprise! Glasscock Elementary staff found a time capsule hidden in storage, uncovering letters and memories from 1992, now inspiring the creation of a new time capsule to be left behind. 

    Chuck Lowery, custodian at Glasscock, found the hidden time capsule back in December, when he was moving new air filters out of a storage area and discovered the tube in a corner. 

  • New Lebanon Elementary School principal hired

    James “Jim” Freeman will be the new principal at Lebanon Elementary School. The LES site-based decision making council made its recommendation Tuesday evening and Freeman accepted the position.
    Freeman currently works as a Leadership Development Specialist for the Kentucky Department of Education. Previously, he was a principal at West Jessamine Middle School, and an assistant principal and athletics director at Garrard County High School.

  • CU graduates record number of graduates

    By Joan C. McKinney
    Director of Campbellsville University Communications

    “Because I cannot add years to my life, I want to add life to my years. If I am not able to do anything about the length of my life, I can do something about its breadth and depth,” Dr. E. Bruce Heilman, 92, chancellor at the University of Richmond in Virginia told Campbellsville University graduates in his commencement address Saturday, May 12.

  • Lebanon native discusses the privilege of college during commencement speech

    By Madison Harris
    Student writer
    EKU Communications

       
    Raley Martin described studying at Eastern Kentucky University as a “privilege” in her commencement address to the College of Letters, Arts and Social Sciences on May 12. She chose that word for a reason.
    The Lebanon native believes that many students allow stress to steer them into thinking of their education as an “obligation rather than an opportunity.”

  • MCHS band performs spring concert

    The Marion County High School Band performed their spring concert recently. The band featured music from their spring assessment in which they received a distinguished rating. The ensemble also featured music from Star Wars and the musical “Hamilton.”
     

  • Student makes a difference in the world with school project

    Myliah Brown, 15, a Marion County Knight Academy student, didn’t just complete a school project recently – she made a difference in the world.
    Brown’s mother, Myranda Gray of Lebanon, said her daughter has been concerned with the well-being of others since she could speak. Brown would tell her mother that she wanted to help provide care for people who couldn’t afford it for themselves.