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Government

  • Tempers flare during wage discussion

     The members of the Marion County Fiscal Court agree that county employees deserve to be paid more, but how the county can afford to do that is unclear.

    The fiscal court held a special-called meeting on Feb. 13 to discuss employee salaries, and several county employees from various departments attended. 

  • Economic development report positive for City of Lebanon

     Tom Lund, executive director of the Marion County Industrial Foundation, reviewed the foundation’s annual report with the Lebanon City Council on Feb. 11, and discussed the latest news with industries in Marion County.

    “In the distilled spirits sector of Marion County, Makers Mark has taken on a $495 million dollar expansion, Diageo announcing a $130 million dollar expansion, so that is $625 million into the Marion County and Lebanon sector.”

    Lund said Diageo will also be partnering with local agriculture. 

  • Farm Service Agency reopens amidst government shutdown

    The federal government is reopened, temporarily at least, but many federal agencies and employees continue to feel the impact of the longest government shutdown in United States’ history.

    The shutdown, which began on Dec. 22 and temporarily ended on Jan. 25, has been a challenge for the Kentucky Farm Service Office, according to State Executive Director Brian D. Lacefield

  • Government shutdown’s impact trickling down to Marion County

     The partial government shutdown that started before Christmas is the longest in U.S. history, and its impact is being felt in Marion County.

    “The government shutdown is in Marion County’s pocket now,” Marion County Jailer Barry Brady told the Marion County Fiscal Court during its meeting Thursday, Jan. 17.

    Brady received a letter from the U.S. Marshal Service last week, informing him there will be a delay in payment for federal inmates being housed at the detention center.

  • Ky. State Treasurer returns $247,953 to Marion County

    The Kentucky State Treasury has experienced another year of record unclaimed property returns under the leadership of Treasurer Allison Ball, her office recently announced. Treasurer Ball has returned more unclaimed property in a three-year period than any state treasurer in Kentucky history. To date, her office has returned over $70,167,000 to Kentuckians. This record amount of returns includes $247,953 returned to Marion County since she took office.

  • Magistrate indicted, charged with a Class D felony

    Magistrate John Arthur Elder III was indicted in Marion Circuit Court Thursday, Sept. 5.

    Elder, 53, of 311 North Spalding Avenue in Lebanon was officially charged with theft by failure to make required disposition of property, a Class D felony.

  • Costs climbing for county jails

     The costs to incarcerate continue to climb for Marion County, as well as every other community in the state that operates a jail. 

    While county jails were never intended to do more than simply warehouse inmates, Marion County Jailer Barry Brady and his staff have gone above and beyond that for the inmates they serve to help them become productive members of society rather than repeat offenders.

    And, doing so costs more money.

  • Too much discretion?

     “Community project funds”.

    “Fiscal court project funds”.

    “Discretionary funds”.

    No matter what they’re called, they’ve been under scrutiny recently by Marion County Judge/Executive David Daugherty. 

    A stricter policy needs to be approved regarding these funds, Daugherty told magistrates at the Marion County Fiscal Court’s meeting on Aug. 2.

    So, what are these funds, exactly? 

  • Judge/executive wants more oversight on magistrates’ discretionary funds

    Marion County Judge/Executive David Daugherty wants the county to have more oversight and be more transparent in its use of project and discretionary funds.

    According to Judge Daugherty, magistrates have $10,000 in project funds and $10,000 in discretionary funds to use for their districts each fiscal year. There are guidelines regarding how those funds can be used, but those guidelines need to be reviewed and a stricter policy needs to be approved regarding those funds, he said.

  • Rupa vs. City of Lebanon

     Deanna Rupa of Lebanon is fighting city government to allow murals she’s commissioned on her rental home to remain where they are, which according to zoning officials, is against city ordinances.

    Rupa’s home is located on Woodlawn Avenue, and the murals are painted by Melvin James, local legally-blind artist. The murals celebrate African American visionaries and leaders, as well as other current events, such as the current scandal surrounding Papa John’s founder and chairman, John Schnatter, over alleged racially charged comments.