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Local News

  • Autism workshop coming to Bardstown

    The Kentucky Autism Training Center at the University of Louisville is offering a workshop for parents, educators and other professionals to help them create a supportive, positive environment for those with autism and adopt strategies to address challenging behaviors.

  • Out of the way, but easy to find

     

    Always expect the unexpected.

    That’s a life lesson Missy C. Luckett, 46, has learned time and time again.

  • Judge strikes down restricted zones at polling sites

    Kentucky has prohibited campaigning near polling places on primary and general election days for several years, but that ban was struck down Tuesday in a ruling by Judge William O. Bertlesman of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky.

  • Her journey is her destination

    Not many people can say they’ve done what Tonya Claypool has done in the last 13 years.

    She’s been in all 48 contiguous states and Mexico. She also owns her own business, and she has a pretty nice ride, too.

    In 2001, Claypool decided to make a change and to pursue her dream of becoming a truck driver.

  • State officials preparing for ebola, if necessary

    Keith Brock reported that the state is aware of issues regarding ebola and other viruses during the Oct. 16 meeting of the Marion County Fiscal Court.

    “It’s not a pleasant subject but it’s a real subject,” said Brock, the county solid waste and environmental coordinator.

  • County Judge candidate: David Daugherty

    David Daugherty, 46, is a 1986 graduate of Marion County High School. He attended St. Catharine College and Eastern Kentucky University and completed 130 hours of business classes. He and his wife, Renee, have triplets, Ben, Katelyn and Samantha. Daugherty is employed as a loan officer at Farmers National Bank. 

    1. This race is a bit unusual in that it is a rematch of the primary. What would you like to tell voters that they might not have learned in the spring? 

  • County Judge candidate: Doug Mattingly

    Doug Mattingly, 54, is a 1980 graduate of Marion County High School. He also worked for the Marion County Board of Education doing maintenance until he retired in 2009.

    He and his wife, Charlotte, have two children, Leanne and Logan, and three grandchildren.

    1. This race is a bit unusual in that it is a rematch of the primary. What would you like to tell voters that they might not have learned in the spring?

  • Pill drop box at LPD

     The Lebanon Police Depart-ment has a medication drop box in the lobby of the police department, and it’s accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Lebanon Police Chief Wally Brady said the public can bring unwanted medications and drop them in the box, no questions asked. The medications will be safely and securely destroyed. Brady said since February of 2013, the LPD has collected more than 100 pounds of prescription pills. Needles and liquids are not accepted in the drop box.

  • Lebanon man is recovering after Hwy. 208 accident

     A Lebanon man was struck while putting out his garbage on Hwy. 208 Thursday morning.

    Mitchell L. Rakes, 78, of Lebanon  was listed in serious but stable condition at University Hospital in Louisville as of Friday morning.

    Rakes was transported to Spring View Hospital following the collision that occurred at 6:18 a.m. Oct. 16 on Hwy. 208, approximately two miles west of Lebanon.

  • Judge strikes down Kentucky's election day restricted zones

     Kentucky has prohibited campaigning near polling places on primary and general election days for several years, but that ban was struck down Tuesday in a ruling by Judge William O. Bertlesman of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky.

    Bertlesman ruled that the law was unconstitutional and issued an injunction barring the state from enforcing the law. While noting a Supreme Court decision that upheld a 100-foot ban as acceptable to prevent things like voter intimidation, he concluded that the 300-feet ban was too much.