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Today's News

  • Louisville man gets two years for burglary, drug possession

    Richard Greer, 21, of 2310 E. Jefferson Street in Louisville had his probation revoked on charges of third-degree burglary and first-degree possession of a controlled substance. His two-year sentence was reinstated for those charges because Greer violated the terms of his probation.

    In other circuit court matters:

  • Talk turkey to me

    Few foods receive the fanfare of turkey come the holiday season. The National Turkey Federation says Americans eat 46 million turkeys each Thanksgiving and another 22 million on Christmas. An additional 19 million enjoy turkey as part of their Easter celebrations.
    Though turkey is enjoyed throughout the year, it is most popular during the holiday season. Some celebrants may want to know more about this beloved bird before sinking their teeth into their next holiday meal. The following turkey tidbits may surprise you.

  • Little turkeys from Lebanon Elementary give thanks

    The Enterprise recently visited with McCall Thompson’s first grade students at Lebanon Elementary School to find out what they like about Thanksgiving and for what they are thankful. Here’s what they told us.

    Shannon Davis likes that she gets to eat her favorite food, turkey, on Thanksgiving. She is thankful for her grandparents “because we get to play outside there.”

    Kinley Craig’s favorite part of Thanksgiving is seeing her cousins and her aunt. She is thankful for “My Dad because I love him.”

  • Centuries of life

    Last month, Village of Lebanon marked a milestone of sorts. Four of its residents have reached at least 100 years old, and two of those residents, Ethel Mae Bradshaw and Chloe Mattingly, shared some thoughts about their century on Earth.

    One hundred years ago, Woodrow Wilson was the President of the United States. Charlie Chaplin's movie "The Tramp" was released. The world's first successful blood transfusion took place in Brussels.

  • Corrections, Nov. 26

    A cutline on page B1 of the Nov. 12 edition incorrectly identified Katie Overstreet as Kaylee Wheatley.

    Due to a reporter’s error, a mistake was published in the Nov. 19 article, “School board looks to cut energy use, costs.” An item listed in other business should have read that the Marion County Board of Education approved shortened school days for three students in the Exceptional Child Education program.

    The story mistakenly read that the board approved three shortened school days. We apologize for any confusion. 

  • Super, super girl power

    Runner’s high: a feeling of euphoria that is experienced by some individuals engaged in strenuous running, which is associated with the release of endorphins by the brain.

    I’ve experienced the “runner’s high” more times than I can count. 

    It’s real. And it’s fantastic.

  • Small Business Saturday drives local shopping

     By Patricia Krausman

    University of Kentucky Small Business Development Center Director

    While the Thanksgiving Day rush for door buster deals may focus on national stores, small businesses are certainly a big part of the holiday shopping mix. 

  • Thanksgiving history with a Kentucky twist

     While the Fourth of July is understandably the most American holiday, Thanksgiving can at least lay claim to being the first.

    Its origin, as even our youngest students can tell us, began long before our independence, and we’re now just seven years away from the 400th anniversary of when the Pilgrims and Native Americans held a three-day feast.

  • School board meets tonight in Loretto

     The Marion County Board of Education is scheduled to meet in regular session at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 25, at Loretto City Hall, 110 School Drive in Loretto.

    The agenda of the meet includes the following:

    CALL TO ORDER

    PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE/MOMENT OF SILENCE

    COMMUNICATIONS

  • Enterprise to deliver letters to Santa

    The Lebanon Enterprise continues to partner with the jolliest man in the land, Santa Claus, and delivers local letters to him at the North Pole before Christmas.
    The Enterprise will also continue the tradition of publishing letters written by local children. A special edition of the paper will include letters to Santa from each class (pre-K through fifth grade) from all five of our elementary schools.