.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • You are more than an ACT score

     Confession: I didn’t do very well on the ACT exam when I was a Marion County High School student.

    In fact, I scored so low on the math portion of the exam that I was almost forced to take a remedial math course in college, which I wouldn’t have received credit for completing. But, being the stubborn “I know I can do it” person that I am, I elected to take a college freshman-level math course. I passed with an above average grade, and received college credit for completing the course.

    The point I’m trying to make is two-fold:

  • Can we still be ourselves online?

     A few weeks ago, I declared a break from social media. 

    I felt like a zombie and I wanted… no… needed a break. It was nice to have what was about a month long breakup from it. A month, because, well yeah, I’m back on it again. 

    It happened slowly, but soon enough I was checking it and posting online again, but this time around feels a little better. I’m not logging in as often, and I try to limit myself and be more mindful about it. On the weekends, I really try to go without. 

  • Obit blaming Trump for hastening woman's death should have been published

     When Frances Irene Finley Williams took her last breath on Nov. 21, 2018, her family wanted it known that, while Donald Trump didn’t kill her, he certainly accelerated her demise.

    An 87-year-old spitfire of a lady who had a voracious appetite for news and strong opinions about the direction of the country, she told her daughter about six months before her death, “If I die soon, all this Trump stuff has had an effect.”

    So when her heart and her lungs gave out the day before Thanksgiving, her daughter, Cathy Duff, knew what she had to do.

  • Transparency eroding in Frankfort

    Sen. Danny Carroll gave new meaning during the first week of this year’s General Assembly session to the adage “better late than never” by pulling a bill he presented as protecting the personal information of law enforcement officers, judges, social service professionals and even firefighters from criminal crazies seeking retaliation but instead would have greatly increased the burden for law-abiding citizens seeking vital information about their own government. 

  • A new career in the new year

     As we look forward to the opportunities and possibilities of a new year, many will resolve to improve their career outlooks in 2019. As is the case for any New Year’s resolution, such as eating healthier or saving more money, careful reflection, research and support are critical to your success. 

  • A year in Lebanon

     The start of the New Year - Jan. 3 to be exact - officially marks one year I’ve lived and worked in Lebanon and Marion County.

    One year of writing. More than 250 stories. Thousands of pictures. And many, many people who have invited me into their homes, their businesses, and a few dairy barns, and most importantly, into their lives. 

  • Your input is valued and needed

    As we usher in the New Year and the 153rd Regular Session of the Kentucky General Assembly, I’m honored to once again represent our district. 

  • Open your mind and heart, and close your mouth

     I will not let the bah humbug get to my Christmas spirit.

    Tis the season of caring and sharing and I feel so fortunate to live and work in an area with so much of that, not only at Christmas but all year long.

  • A year in Lebanon

     The start of the New Year - Jan. 3 to be exact - officially marks one year I’ve lived and worked in Lebanon and Marion County.

    One year of writing. More than 250 stories. Thousands of pictures. And many, many people who have invited me into their homes, their businesses, and a few dairy barns, and most importantly, into their lives. 

  • Shoot it to you straight

     Jackie Wicker and Steve Masterson cast their final votes as magistrates on the Marion County Fiscal Court this past Thursday.

    They have been serving this county for 16 years.