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Columns

  • Sometimes you just need to let your hair down

     Genuine friendships are very hard to come by. I have had my fair share of people casually walk in and out of my life, with me thinking they had their best intentions for me and they definitely did not. I know I’m still young, and I am at an age where I’m still trying to figure out who I am, but I’ve come to see that the people I surround myself with have a great impact on the person I am becoming. 

  • The interviewing process: Prepare to stand out

     With graduation season upon us, we’re seeing a wave of new job seekers in the market, from a new high school graduate looking for a first job to the established professional who has earned an advanced degree in order to take the next step in a long career. Regardless of education and experience level, job seekers often find the interview is the most daunting aspect of a job search. 

  • Two men and a nation

     In previous articles, I have written about two local farmers and their separate paths to raising hemp, beginning in the early 1940s. Some may find it ironic that they attended the same small church in town, and yes, I was a member and witness to their attendance.  

  • Lawmakers’ work continues through summer

     It’s nearly summertime! Time for a break from school, barbecues, baseball and maybe a vacation. But June also marks the start of the interim period for the Kentucky General Assembly.

    That’s a time when standing committees of both chambers come together to form interim joint committees. For instance, the transportation committees of the House and Senate become the Interim Joint Committee on Transportation.

  • Customer service survival: 8 types of customers you’ll encounter at a restaurant

     As of this past March, I have worked at the same restaurant for four years. I got my first job right as I turned 16, and I have since learned countless lessons about customer service. 

    When you have worked in a job where you are paid to serve others, you meet all different types of people, some are great, others… well, let’s just say we hope they have a better day. 

  • More than just familiar faces

     There are some people in our lives who we only know on a first name basis, but we see them almost every single day.

    We see them when we’re buying our morning coffee. Working out at the gym. Ordering lunch. Cashing a check at the bank. Pumping gas. Buying our groceries. Checking our mail at the Post Office. Buying the newspaper.

    We often engage in small talk with these folks. A friendly “good morning” here, or a “nice weather we’re having” there. 

    In some cases, we may not know their names at all. 

  • Can a hobbled democracy still turn out voters? 

     Our democracy seems like it’s in chains or stuck in a deep rut. 

    Much-needed policy discussions that belong in a democracy are cut short and replaced by a new norm which simply excludes debating and replaces it with a partisan approach. This develops hostility leading to a toxic environment of distrust. That’s ripping our democracy apart.     

  • Local everyday heroes

     Have you ever had a friend or perfect stranger just “appear” out of nowhere when you were in serious need of help? Afterward, we wish we would have conveyed a kind word or small gesture.  Well, they say it may never be too late.

  • It happens to the best of us

    By Marlena Stokes

    Summer intern

     

    Whether they want to admit it or not, everyone has those days. 

    You know, the ones that really just hit your last nerve, because they could only happen to you, right? 

    I am here to tell you--you are not alone. 

  • Class of 2019: Possibilities abound here in Kentucky

     We are in the heart of high school graduation season so I wanted to congratulate the graduates from my district – and the whole of Kentucky.

    The graduates will undoubtedly be bombarded with advice. I’m not going to presume to know what’s best for individual graduates, but I will direct them to some data-driven analysis. Data they need so they can make some fact-based choices as they move toward a future that looks bright, particularly in this region. The facts speak for themselves.