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Opinion

  • When State Rep. Chris Harris decided last week to back some gun regulations following the school shootings in Benton, Kentucky, and Parkland, Florida, he expected some feedback. 

    But, wow. 

    In the days since I wrote about the longtime NRA supporter who signed onto a bill that would seek to keep guns used in violent crimes from going back on the streets, Harris has been inundated. 

    Some of the responses good. Some of them bad. 

  • You had a son or daughter who served a tour of duty in the military. He came home after their tour safe from any harm. Your school-aged child did not survive his school years. He was shot and killed in the sixth grade. This is what we’re seeing today.

    The only way these types of killings will be stopped is by gun laws. The manufacturing of military type guns needs to be outlawed. All of these types of guns in the hands of persons other than law enforcement need to, by law, be turned in.

  • When we think about the economic health of the Lincoln Trail region, it’s clear our eight-county area has a lot going for it. 

    We’re seeing investments from both new companies and businesses already operating in our communities. Our entrepreneurial culture has led to many successful start-ups. Employers in a wide array of industries are now hiring. And thanks to attributes such as our logistics-friendly location and business-friendly climate, our economic forecast is just as bright. 

  • It has been a busy week in our state capitol. From continuing work to craft a budget, presenting bills before committees, and the release of a pension reform measure, there has been no shortage of activity.

  • Putting guns in the hands of teachers is not the answer to enhancing school safety.
    The idea routinely pops up on social media comments following a mass shooting at a school such as what happened in Marshall County High School last month or Parkland, Florida last week.
    People voicing their opinions on social media is one thing, though. It is a completely different issue for lawmakers to seriously consider allowing teachers to go armed.

  • Editor’s note: The following post was written on Facebook by the owner of Kentucky Gun Company in Bardstown regarding the advertisement that can be seen wrapped around the front page of this week’s edition.

    Friends and Critics of KYGUNCO,

  • By Stuart W. Sanders
     
    One afternoon in May 1918, my 12-year-old grandfather was walking home from school in Louisville when he encountered a man from his neighborhood.
    Run home fast, the man said, your father’s dead.
    With this abrupt message, my grandfather sprinted home, tears streaming down his face. His father had died from “edema of the lungs,” which was brought about by complications from influenza.

  • End the violence
    Another day. Another deadly school shooting. This time in Florida. Seventeen dead.
    How many more kids and teachers have to die in our schools before elected officials do what's required to stop it? We have become a nation of violence and the NRA propaganda has infected our culture.
    We now have a gun violence crisis and an opioid crisis. When will we all come to our senses and demand that these politicians who champion NRA "gun rights" give back the millions of dollars they get from them?

  • By State Rep. Brandon Reed
     
    Last week in Frankfort marked the halfway point of the 2018 legislative session. Kentucky is a robust state, with many incredibly good traits, and some serious issues still to tackle. Every two years in Frankfort, the legislature is charged with crafting a budget to fund important government programs like education, public safety and transportation, just to name a few.

  • By Leah Hazelwood

     

    My hair has always stood out in the crowd. It’s big, curly, and what a casting agency considers an “afro,” but most of all beautiful. I have fully embraced my curls since junior high, but all years prior to this were the polar opposite. I hated my hair, I hated my skin and I hated who I was. 

  • Last week, I talked a lot about how touched I’ve been by some of the stories I’ve gotten to share, so far. I got to meet the Mattingly children, Emma and Tripp, and I had flashbacks to a very similar time in my life.

    I also sat down with Gail King and her husband, John, and she kept saying to me: “We celebrate life… We celebrate birthdays, anniversaries and holidays. And, our family is important. We just celebrate all of life.”

  • At age 10, my daughter started a club. She was going to become a writer and would employ her classmates as apprentices. After devising a contract and business cards headlining in bold print, “Let That Writer Write,” she quickly recruited friends. Business cards were passed out to family, friends and teachers. In essence, this group would “write” whatever was needed. I was even enticed to post the business cards on social media to draw in more business. 

  • The Lebanon Enterprise reported last week that David Ferriell passed away on Feb. 2 after battling COPD, emphysema and Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. Ferriell did battle COPD and emphysema for seven years and Hodgkin’s Lymphoma for six months in 2012. His passing was due to other complication not related to those illnesses, however.

    Elizabeth Hughes of Marion County was not identified in a photo of Kentucky Bluegrass Music Festival winners. She won a Singer/ Songwriter award.

  • Editor’s note: This was originally published in October of 2011.

     

    “Taters!”

    That’s one of my nicknames, which was coined by my middle school basketball coach and physical education teacher at St. Charles Middle School - David Ferriell.

    “Girl, you been eatin’ too many taters,” he would say, teasing me during P.E. class.

  • Currently, I’ve become aware of the increase in advocates for the abolition of the death penalty in Kentucky. What a sensible development that is. It makes so much more sense than the current state law that allows people to kill people as a punishment for killing people. The logic of that stance is impossible for me to understand. Where then does the punishment for killing stop?

  • Kentucky is enjoying economic growth, and the state continues to be home to successful established businesses as well as a hub for emerging entrepreneurs and start-ups.  

    The opportunities for Kentucky and the Lincoln Trail region are limitless, but the constraints on realizing those opportunities are real. Specifically, we face a workforce shortage in part due to this economic growth in so many sectors.

  • Sometimes, you look at an issue or need… a problem, and you think of all the ways in which you can solve it. Sometimes it is an easy fix, and other times… you just don’t have a straight answer. 

    Here at The Lebanon Enterprise, we’ve been working on an editorial about a concern—or complaint depending on how you look at it, about Lebanon itself. It is a concern that has been brought up to us numerous times, which instead has turned into a hundred more questions.

  • One of my biggest frustrations as the publisher of The Lebanon Enterprise is when a legitimate problem and/or concern is brought to my attention, the newspaper reports on the problem to educate the community, but then nothing is done. 

    The newspaper itself can’t solve the problem. 

    I fully understand that. 

    That’s not the newspaper’s responsibility.

  • While House and Senate leadership continue to work on a revised pension bill, attention has shifted to the budget situation facing our Commonwealth. We recently heard the governor present his budget outlook in the State of the Commonwealth address, where he outlined the fiscal challenges we are facing, while also delivering some good news.